Call for Manuscripts The Impact of Natural Disasters on Systemic Political and Social Inequities in the US

Lexington Books, A Division of Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.

Editors
Paul S. Adams, PhD
Geoffrey L. Wood, PhD

The impact of natural disasters in the US on increasing political disenfranchisement and
social inequality is both understudied and misunderstood. Part of the problems is the
absence of a theoretical paradigm, which facilitates the development and application of
ideas, theories and methods that do not fit within the confines of status attainment
scholarship. Categorical inequality—a paradigm developed in 1998 by Charles Tilly—
articulates the manner in which social inequality is established by unequal categories, and
then replicated and reified through existing and new organizational and societal
processes. Moreover, categorical inequality necessitates explicit discussions and
examinations of the nature of power and how it perpetuates the existing social order.
Hence, conventional political and social inequality research often ignores comparative
and historical contexts as the basis for inequities. The promise of this volume is to solicit
manuscripts which will examine the impact of natural disasters in the US on issues of
political and social inequality.

  • We invite manuscripts addressing the following topics:
  • What social or political impacts do natural disasters have on the people who live there?
  • How can political and social theory explain natural disaster outcomes?
    What sorts of methods should we use to discover the impact of natural disasters on
    communities?
  • Other Impacts of Natural Disasters: School-to-prison pipeline, increased crime, decreased
    neighborhood resilience, voting and political participation changes, political
    disenfranchisement, etc.
  • Population studies: Who stays and who goes?
  • At the crossroads of race, class, and gender: how do these matter when exploring natural
    disaster outcomes?
  • What are the roles of organizations, corporations, and government in managing natural
    disaster processes?

Chapter Parameters:

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers (R&L) uses the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th ed., and
Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th ed., as style and spelling guides.
Completed chapters should be 15-20 pages, double-spaced, 12-point font.
Please send brief biographical information, your proposed title, and a 500-word abstract
of proposed content to gew23@pitt.edu by September 30, 2018. Please acknowledge in
the email your willingness to adhere to the timeline below:
Proposal Email: September 30, 2018
Acceptance Notification: October 31, 2018
Completed Chapters Submitted: December 31, 2018
Peer Review Feedback: January 31, 2019
Revisions: February 28, 2019
Editorial Work: March-April 2019
Full Manuscript Sent to Lexington Books: May 2019

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